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Pete is remembered as a wonderful husband and father, his gentle spirit and kind hazel eyes, a smart business mind, and having a reputation for always being the first to have his crop seeded in the spring.

Pete was blessed with and is survived by his wife, Carol, of over 53 years; one son, Gene Granada, of Frazer, MT; one daughter, Genna Granada, of Billings, MT; three grandchildren Dominica, Renee and Gabriel Granada; numerous cousins in France, Spain and California; and many wonderful friends and neighbors. Mc Nabb, age 84 of Glasgow passed away early Sunday morning, December 17, 2017 at Frances Mahon Deaconess Hospital in Glasgow.

Christmas was his favorite holiday where he would put up his Christmas village around the tree and in the surrounding areas of the house.

He liked visiting and playing cards and bingo with his close friends at Nemont Manor, Leona Garsjo, Hilda Rosencrans, Ron Bradford, Cecil Speer and Darryl Cozad.

She developed a love for music in high school that she would carry with her throughout her life.

at Assembly of God Church in Glasgow, Montana with Tom Fauth officiating.

Pete was raised on the family ranch on the Little Porcupine Creek north of Frazer and graduated from Frazer High School in 1953.

Pete attended Montana State College in Bozeman for one year before enlisting in the United States Army at Ft.

He is preceded in death by his parents Benjamin and Delilah; two wives Ruby Sergent and Loraine Crider; two brothers George Sergent and his identical twin, Alfred; and two sisters Florence Sergent and Ethal Underwood.

He is survived by all six children Robert Holms and his wife Connie, of Oregon, David Sergent and his wife Diane, of St.

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